It’s February, and we’re writing this from the shores of a frozen lake south of Stockholm.

It’s been a busy 2016 so far, starting with a profile about Boho in New Scientist magazine, alongside our good friends from Coney, written by Stewart Pringle:

Boho Interactive’s tagline, “we fight dirty for science”, neatly conveys the company’s urgency. Much of its work features fighting talk and disruptive activity.

The company has collaborated with the Stockholm Resilience Centre, a joint initiative of Stockholm University and the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. The centre researches new ways of governing and managing human activity, taking into account the complex needs of the surrounding environment. In other words, it is looking for ways of doing business that don’t trash the planet.

It’s a grand mission, but it doesn’t necessarily need to be played on a grand scale. Boho’s projects include unpicking the systems that sustain a news stand in London’s Euston station. In its large-scale touring performance, Best Festival Ever, the company explores the complex interplay of processes in the management of a major music festival.

Go on, have a read.

We spent a week in January in London with Forum for the Future‘s Systems Innovations Lab. Forum uses systems thinking to help businesses and large organisations tackle sustainability challenges, and we’re hoping to work with them to develop a toolkit of games that they can use in their projects.

Right now we’re undertaking a month-long development in Sweden. Working with Stockholm NGO Miljöverkstan, we’re building a new game based on the Flaten nature reserve south of Stockholm.

Flaten is a lake, surrounded by beautiful forest (oaks, pine, spruce, trees 500 years old or more), and a place where a lot of different groups intersect – swimmers and dogwalkers, itinerant workers camping in caravan parks, squatter camps in the forest, the nearby suburb of Skarpnäck…

Miljöverkstan want to try to capture some of the complexity of the region in an interactive format, so they’ve invited us over to map the system with them and turn it into a game experience, a platform for learning and conversation.

This month we’re building a systems map and putting together a rough prototype of the show. We’ll be returning to Sweden in August and October to finish off the game, and present it for the first time to a Swedish audience.

This is a big project, with a short timeframe, but it’s exciting to be applying the tools we developed through Best Festival Ever to a real-world system.

Feel free to check out our process blog if you’d like to keep track of the creation of the work. As always, we’d love to hear from you with any thoughts, comments and ideas. And if you’re interested in any kind of collaboration or joint project, we’re starting to look towards 2017…

We are delighted to announce the lineup of guest scientists for the Street Theatre shows this August.

Each performance of Best Festival Ever will include a brief Q&A style conversation with a guest scientist, who will discuss some of the ideas and concepts from the show in relation to their own work. We will be joined by top level futurists, ecologists, evolutionary biologists and complex systems scientists, sharing their expertise and answering your questions.

This informal post-show chat will take place over a complimentary glass of wine. This is a pretty delightful opportunity to come face to face with some of Australia’s leading scientists, and we are extremely excited about our guests.

The lineup of guests is as follows:

Wednesday 12 August – Will Steffen (Climate Council)
Will Steffen is an American chemist. He was the executive director of the Australian National University (ANU) Climate Change Institute and a member of the Australian Climate Commission until its abolishment in September 2013. He currently represents The Climate Council.

Thursday 13 August – Brian Walker (CSIRO)
Brian H. Walker is a scientist specialising in ecological sustainability and resilience in socio-ecological systems. He is currently a Research Fellow with CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems and is also Program Director and Chair of the Board of the Resilience Alliance, an international research group working on sustainability of social-ecological systems.

Friday 14 August – Nicky Grigg (CSIRO)
Nicky Grigg works with the CSIRO in interdisciplinary teams on a diverse range of projects concerned with global change and social-ecological systems. She brings experience in mathematical modelling and analysis of social-ecological systems.

Saturday 15 August – Joanne Daly (CSIRO)
Joanne Daly has worked for the CSIRO for over 30 years and is currently a Strategic Advisor and a former Group Executive of Agribusiness and Chief of Division. Her activities focus on strategy for national research collections and in agricultural sciences, particularly transformational agriculture.

Sunday 16 August – Eleanor Malbon (RegNet)
Eleanor Malbon studied Human Ecology with a specialisation in system dynamics and collaborative conceptual modelling. At RegNet she works as a research assistant to Professor Sharon Friel to provide system dynamics expertise to a number of health equity related research projects.

Thursday 20 August – Steve Cork (ANU)
Steven Cork is an adjunct professor at the ANU’s Crawford School of Public Policy.

Friday 21 August – John Finnigan (CSIRO)
John Finnigan is Director of the CSIRO Centre for Complex Systems Science.

Saturday 22 August – Bob Costanza (ANU)
Robert Costanza is a leading ecological economist and Professor of Public Policy at the Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University. His specialties include: transdisciplinary integration, systems ecology, ecological economics, landscape ecology, ecological modeling, ecological design, energy analysis, environmental policy, social traps, incentive structures and institutions.

The show runs 7.00 – 9.00pm (including the conversation) and tickets are $20. You can book on the Street Theatre website – get to yr spaceships.

We are really looking forward to bringing this piece home to Canberra – hopefully we will see some of you there.

Okay so we are excited to announce that we will be bringing Boho’s Best Festival Ever: How To Manage A Disaster to Canberra this August.

We’ll be at the Street Theatre for two weeks over 12 – 22 August.

This will be the first Boho show in Canberra since Word Play in 2013, and the first presentation of Best Festival Ever in Australia. After premiering the show last year with seasons at the Battersea Arts Centre, the London Science Museum and the Stockholm Resilience Centre, we’re really stoked to be bringing this one home.

Best Festival Ever: How To Manage A Disaster places the audience in charge of programming and managing their very own music festival.

Seated around a table, participants take charge of designing, constructing and managing their festival from beginning to end. From taking care of rowdy campsite parties to assembling the perfect lineup of bands, from dealing with artist tantrums to preventing fights in the moshpit, the audience experience every part of the festival manager’s ride.

Part theatre show, part performance lecture and part boardgame, Best Festival Ever introduces participants to concepts from Systems Science and asks how we can best understand and manage the complex systems we live in.

Each of the Canberra shows will feature a conversation with a guest scientist talking about the ideas in the work, including Dr Will Steffen (Climate Council), Dr Bob Costanza (ANU) and Dr Nicky Grigg (CSIRO).

Following the conclusion of Big Day Out, Harvest, Future Music, Stereosonic, the Great Escape and Parklife Festivals, this might be your last chance to experience a music festival in Australia: jump on board.


David here with a final wrap-up note at the end of the first Best Festival Ever season. After 17 shows in 9 venues in London and Stockholm, we’ve finished the show’s first tour and returned to Australia for a break – as well as to plan and prepare for the project’s next phase.

Over November, we presented the show at venues including the Battersea Arts Centre, the London Science Museum, Central St Martins, Kings College London, Forum for the Future, Zone Creative Agency, Färgfabriken, Miljöverkstan and the Stockholm Resilience Centre.

We shared the work with theatre audiences, scientists, high school students, sustainable development post-grads, researchers, festival-makers, urban planners, museum staff and corporate groups.

Fereday Films produced a great video of the show in action, which you can check out here:

Perhaps the most satisfying part of the work for me was the discussions with the audience we held after the show. For our Science Museum season, scientists Yvonne Rydin, James Millington, Chris Brierley and Emily Lines presented short talks after the shows, discussing their own work in relation to the systems science ideas in Best Festival Ever. The conversations about sustainability, planning, climate change and complex systems were incredibly rewarding to listen to.

That’s it for Best Festival Ever in 2014. In 2015 we’ll be looking at further tours for the show both within Australia and overseas. We’re also seeking to begin partnerships with other organisations to develop new interactive tabletop works looking at specific systems.

If you’re interested in knowing more, or if you’d like to chat about a possible collaboration, please drop us a line. And thanks to everyone who contributed their support to make this project happen – we’re hugely grateful!

Cheers from David, David, Nikki, Nathan and Rachel!

David here. There’s a flurry of excitement in the Boho camp this week, because we’re about to get on the plane and head over to the UK for the next three months.

As some of you may know, Boho was in residence at the University College London Environment Institute in 2012, developing our systems science tabletop board-game / theatre show Best Festival Ever: How To Manage A Disaster. The show was created in partnership with a lot of great UK artists and organisations, so it’s a huge pleasure to announce that we’re launching the first full production of Best Festival Ever this November at the London Science Museum.

There’s some background on the Best Festival Ever project here if you’d like to know more about the show.

Image by Andrew Galan

David Finnigan and David Shaw from Boho will once again be joined by Nathan Harrison, Nikki Kennedy and Rachel Roberts from Applespiel, and we’ll be working with UK theatre artists including Tassos Stevens (Coney) and designer Gary Campbell.

We’ll be in residence at the Science Museum from mid-September until the end of November, refining and rehearsing the finished show. Public performances will kick off with a short scratch season at the Battersea Arts Centre at the end of October, followed by a two week season at the Science Museum’s Dana Centre from 10-24 November. We’ll be presenting a series of evening performances at the Centre alongside short talks by climate scientists in response to the work.

Finally, we’ll be taking off to Sweden at the end of November for a week-long tour to the Stockholm Resilience Centre. We’ll be sharing our take on Systems and Resilience Thinking back to some of the scientists who first formulated these ideas, and whose work we’ve been drawing on over the last three years – as you can imagine, we’re excited and also fairly intimidated!

We’ll be keeping track of our progress on this blog, so please keep an eye out if you’re interested.

If you’d like to chat with us about Best Festival Ever, please get in touch! If you’re interested in our presenting the show at your venue or workplace, if you’d like us to create a new game around a system of your choosing, or even if you’re just curious, we’d love to hear from you.

DATES

30 Oct – 1 Nov – Battersea Arts Centre scratch season

10 – 24 Nov – London Science Museum season

25 – 29 Nov – Stockholm Resilience Centre season

© 2017 Boho Interactive Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha